Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Science, Conservation, and National Parks$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Steven R. Beissinger, David D. Ackerly, Holly Doremus, and Gary E. Machlis

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780226422954

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226423142.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use (for details see http://www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 26 April 2018

Protecting National Parks from Air Pollution Effects: Making Sausage from Science and Policy

Protecting National Parks from Air Pollution Effects: Making Sausage from Science and Policy

Chapter:
(p.141) Seven Protecting National Parks from Air Pollution Effects: Making Sausage from Science and Policy
Source:
Science, Conservation, and National Parks
Author(s):

Jill S. Baron

Tamara Blett

William C. Malm

Ruth M. Alexander

Holly Doremus

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226423142.003.0007

The story of air pollution research, policy development, and management in national parks is a fascinating blend of cultural change, vision, interdisciplinary and interagency collaboration, and science-policy-management-stakeholder collaborations. Unable to ignore the loss of iconic vistas from regional haze and loss of fish from acid rain in the 1980s, the US National Park Service (NPS) embraced an obligation to protect resources from threats originating outside park boundaries. Upholding the Organic Act requirement for parks to remain “unimpaired” for the enjoyment of future generations, and using the Clean Air Act statement that the NPS has an “affirmative responsibility” to protect park resources, the NPS has supported, and effectively used, research as a means to protect lands, waters, and vistas from a mostly unseen threat. Using visibility and atmospheric nitrogen deposition as examples, we illustrate some success stories where the NPS led the way to benefit not only parks, but the nation.

Keywords:   acid rain, air pollution, atmospheric deposition, national parks, nitrogen deposition, visibility

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.