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Get Out of My Room!A History of Teen Bedrooms in America$
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Jason Reid

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780226409214

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2017

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226409351.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use (for details see http://www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 20 November 2017

Danger!

Danger!

Chapter:
(p.167) Seven Danger!
Source:
Get Out of My Room!
Author(s):

Jason Reid

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226409351.003.0008

As the title suggests, chapter 7 focuses on the purported dangers of giving teenagers rooms of their own. Despite the fact that most Cold War era observers saw the separate bedroom ideal in largely positive terms, a vocal minority suggested that this custom encouraged a host of social ills, including drug and alcohol use, sexual experimentation, mental illness, suicide, occult activities, and possession of forbidden forms of popular culture (e.g. comic books and heavy metal music). Many of these complaints seem to have centered around the notion that the teen bedroom offered teenagers too much privacy, thus encouraging the younger generation to engage in behavior that wouldn't have been possible in an era when stricter forms of parental surveillance were more prevalent.

Keywords:   drugs and alcohol, teen sexuality, suicide, mental illness, occult activities, heavy metal, moral panics, privacy, Judas Priest, pornography

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