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Our Children, Their Children
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Our Children, Their Children: Confronting Racial and Ethnic Differences in American Juvenile Justice

Darnell F. Hawkins and Kimberly Kempf-Leonard

Abstract

This book argues that a second-rate and increasingly punitive juvenile justice system is allowed to persist because most people believe it is designed for children in other ethnic and socioeconomic groups. While public opinion, laws, and social policies that convey distinctions between “our children” and “their children” may seem to conflict with the American ideal of blind justice, they are hardly at odds with patterns of group differentiation and inequality that have characterized much of American history. The book provides an examination of racial and ethnic disparities in the American juve ... More

Keywords: juvenile justice, ethnicity, socioeconomic groups, United States, suburban sprawl, family, bias, mental health, public opinion, social policy

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2005 Print ISBN-13: 9780226319889
Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013 DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226319919.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Darnell F. Hawkins, editor

Kimberly Kempf-Leonard, editor

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Contents

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Front Matter

1 Introduction

Darnell F. Hawkins and Kimberly Kempf-Leonard

1 Racial and Ethnic Differences in Juvenile Crime and Punishment: Past and Present

4 Degrees of Discretion

David S. Tanenhaus

2 Understanding Race Differences in Offending and the Administration of Justice

6 Suburban Sprawl, Race, and Juvenile Justice

Paul A. Jargowsky, Scott A. Desmond, and Robert D. Crutchfield

7 Race and Crime

Alex R. Piquero, Terrie E. Moffitt, and Brian Lawton

8 Explaining Assessments of Future Risk

Sara Steen, Christine E. W. Bond, George S. Bridges, and Charis E. Kubrin

9 “Justice by Geography”

Timothy M. Bray, Lisa L. Sample, and Kimberly Kempf-Leonard

3 Toward Remedial Social Policy

11 Disproportionate Minority Confinement/Contact (DMC)

Carl E. Pope and Michael J. Leiber

14 Conclusion: Our Children, Their Children

Kimberly Kempf-Leonard and Darnell F. Hawkins