Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Alain L. LockeThe Biography of a Philosopher$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Leonard Harris and Charles Molesworth

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780226317762

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226317809.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use (for details see www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 14 December 2018

Harvard

Harvard

Chapter:
(p.28) Chapter Two Harvard
Source:
Alain L. Locke
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226317809.003.0003

Alain L. Locke arrived at Harvard University with considerable ambition, after two years at the School of Pedagogy, but even he did not foresee that in his senior year, as the first African American winner of a Rhodes Scholarship, he would become the object of national attention. Harvard aided in the intensity of that attention. In the opening decade of the twentieth century, the college could be seen as one of the birthplaces of modern culture. Locke's letters home are almost completely free of anxiety; indeed, he seems to the manor born in the way he was able to take full advantage of the literary and cultural life that the college abundantly supplied. At the same time, however, Locke was to discover new facets of his racial identity and to set in motion ideas and concerns that would lead him in a direction quite distinct from the vast majority of his classmates.

Keywords:   Alain L. Locke, Harvard University, School of Pedagogy, modern culture, racial identity, Rhodes Scholarship

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.