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The Iconoclastic ImaginationImage, Catastrophe, and Economy in America from the Kennedy Assassination to September 11$
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Ned O'Gorman

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226310060

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226310374.001.0001

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The Neoliberal Legitimation Crisis

The Neoliberal Legitimation Crisis

Chapter:
(p.23) 1 The Neoliberal Legitimation Crisis
Source:
The Iconoclastic Imagination
Author(s):

Ned O'Gorman

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226310374.003.0002

In chapter one, which begins part one, differentiates liberalism from neoliberalism by contrasting Jürgen Habermas’s theory of “legitimation crisis” with that of Friedrich Hayek’s in The Road to Serfdom. It argues that while the former is concerned with consequences of the poverty of social meaning for the state, the latter is concerned with destructive potential of the artificial overproduction of meaning by the state. Situating Hayek’s thought within the context of both World-War-II-era Fascism and the Cold War, the chapter connects Hayek’s concerns and the anxieties of President Eisenhower amidst the civil rights crises in Little Rock, Arkansas in 1957. Chapter one concludes with a discussion of the implications of liberal and neoliberal approaches to legitimation crisis for democracies.

Keywords:   legitimation, meaning, democracy

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