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The Changing FrontierRethinking Science and Innovation Policy$
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Adam B. Jaffe and Benjamin F. Jones

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226286723

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226286860.001.0001

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The Endless Frontier

The Endless Frontier

Reaping What Bush Sowed?

Chapter:
(p.321) 10 The Endless Frontier
Source:
The Changing Frontier
Author(s):

Paula Stephan

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226286860.003.0011

This chapter examines and documents how the Endless Frontier changed the research landscape at universities and how universities responded to the initiative. I show that the agencies it established and funded initially recruited research proposals from faculty and applications from students for fellowships and scholarships. By the 1960s, universities began to push for more resources from the federal government for research, support for faculty salary and research assistants and higher indirect costs. The process transformed the relationship between universities and federal funders; it also transformed the relationship between universities and faculty. The university research system that has grown and evolved faces a number of challenges that threaten the health of universities and the research enterprise and have implications for discovery and innovation. Five are discussed in the closing section. They are (1) a proclivity on the part of faculty and funding agencies to be risk averse; (2) the tendency to produce more PhDs than the market for research positions demands; (3) a heavy concentration of research in the biomedical sciences; (4) a continued expansion on the part of universities that may place universities at increased financial risk and (5) a flat or declining amount of federal funds for research.

Keywords:   research universities, funding for research, peer review, PhD production, indirect costs, basic research

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