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Steam-Powered KnowledgeWilliam Chambers and the Business of Publishing, 1820-1860$
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Aileen Fyfe

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780226276519

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226276540.001.0001

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Industrial Book Production

Industrial Book Production

Chapter:
(p.31) 2 Industrial Book Production
Source:
Steam-Powered Knowledge
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226276540.003.0003

Chambers's Edinburgh Journal described the changes in the book trade in the first half of the nineteenth century as a “great revolution in the business of the printer.” Machine printing and stereotyping helped to save the labor costs of press work and composition. Such journals defined stereotyping as a “means of keeping up fictitious types to answer future demands, at an expense infinitely inferior to that of keeping the actual pages standing.” William Savage did not deny that their ability to print faster and on larger sheets of paper offered the machines great merit in terms of speed, which was essential to newspapers and certain periodicals. The factors that can alter the structure and organization of the book trade were publishers' decisions to use machine-made paper, stereotyping, and machine printing.

Keywords:   book production, Chambers's Edinburgh Journal, book trade, machine printing, stereotyping, machine-made paper, William Savage

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