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The Politics of Pain MedicineA Rhetorical-Ontological Inquiry$
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S. Scott Graham

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226264059

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2016

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226264196.001.0001

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Networks of Calibration

Networks of Calibration

Chapter:
(p.175) Chapter Six Networks of Calibration
Source:
The Politics of Pain Medicine
Author(s):

S. Scott Graham

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226264196.003.0007

This chapter investigates the networks of calibration that surround the Food and Drug Administration as an institution of rarefaction. The chapter explores how different professional organizations, pharmaceuticals corporations, scholarly publications, and advocacy organizations attempt to and succeed at impacting the FDA’s efforts at cross-ontological calibration. As a part of this argument, this chapter rejects the hegemonic fallacy, as identified by Bryant, and argues that an effective approach to rhetorical-ontological analysis of science, technology, and medicine must proceed without facile appeals to hegemonic forces. Ultimately, this chapter extends the analyses of the sinus headache and fibromyalgia from the preceding chapter.

Keywords:   actor-network theory, calibration, fibromyalgia, Food and Drug Administration, Foucault, multiple ontologies, pharmaceuticals policy, principles of rarefaction, sinus headache

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