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The Renewal of GenerosityIllness, Medicine, and How to Live$
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Arthur W. Frank

Print publication date: 2004

Print ISBN-13: 9780226260150

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: February 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226260259.001.0001

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Unfinalized Generosity

Unfinalized Generosity

Chapter:
(p.123) Chapter Six Unfinalized Generosity
Source:
The Renewal of Generosity
Author(s):

Arthur W. Frank

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226260259.003.0007

This chapter explores the premise that in order to live a human life, people need the generosity of their fellow humans. Generosity offers something different in each of these stories, but it always begins in dialogue: speaking with someone, not about them; entering a space between each other, in which they remain other, alter, but in which they each offer themselves to be changed by the other. When generosity is lacking, that is not because humans have suddenly lost their capacity for it. Modern organizational life, both governmental and corporate, has proliferated a style of being human that was once restricted. This style is the artificial person, and as real as its other values are it transforms generosity from a moral relationship into an administrative problem.

Keywords:   human life, generosity, dialogue, modern organizational life, artificial person, moral relationship, administrative problem

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