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Nietzsche’s EnlightenmentThe Free-Spirit Trilogy of the Middle Period$
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Paul Franco

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780226259819

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226259840.001.0001

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Human, All too Human and the Problem of Culture

Human, All too Human and the Problem of Culture

Chapter:
(p.13) One Human, All too Human and the Problem of Culture
Source:
Nietzsche’s Enlightenment
Author(s):

Paul Franco

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226259840.003.0002

This chapter presents an argument positing that the aphorisms that comprise Human, All too Human are not simply isolated or disconnected insights and that Nietzsche ultimately does have a theory to prove and even an ax to grind, albeit a very complicated one. One obvious way in which the aphorisms of Human, All too Human begin to lose the appearance of being isolated monads is that they are organized into thematic chapters, with metaphysics being treated in the first, morality in the second, religion in the third, art in the fourth, culture in the fifth, and so forth. Though these chapter divisions supply a certain organization to the book, they do not really provide a key to how the book is to be read as a whole. The chapters stand alongside one another without any clear indication as to how they are to be integrated into a single, coherent argument.

Keywords:   aphorisms, culture, nietzsche, religion, morality

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