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InteranimationsReceiving Modern German Philosophy$
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Robert B. Pippin

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226259659

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226259796.001.0001

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Slavoj Žižek’s Hegel

Slavoj Žižek’s Hegel

Chapter:
(p.91) 4 Slavoj Žižek’s Hegel
Source:
Interanimations
Author(s):

Robert B. Pippin

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226259796.003.0004

Žižek argues in his book, Less than Nothing, that the version of Hegel that has become the whipping boy for much of Continental Philosophy and for the analytic traditions is a straw man, and that Hegel’s position still has much to offer in any historical diagnosis of the present age. I agree with him, but do not agree that he has successfully characterized the “Hegelian option.” The basic Hegelian problem that the book addresses is the ontological problem of “subjectivity”; what is it to be a thinking, knowing and also acting and interacting subject in a material world? This problem is tied to the question of how we should understand that subject’s status as “not” an object in the world like all others. (This is the source of the book’s title.) I argue here against Žižek’s interpretation and present an alternative.

Keywords:   Alain Badiou, Jacques Lacan, Emmanuel Levinas, Martin Heidegger, Fichte, Henrich, JM Coetzee, Alfred Hitchcock, ontology, discursive historicism

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