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Drones and the Future of Armed ConflictEthical, Legal, and Strategic Implications$
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David Cortright, Rachel Fairhurst, and Kristen Wall

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226258058

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226258195.001.0001

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Winning without War

Winning without War

Evaluating Military and Nonmilitary Strategies for Countering Terrorism

Chapter:
(p.142) Chapter Nine Winning without War
Source:
Drones and the Future of Armed Conflict
Author(s):

David Cortright

Rachel Fairhurst

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226258195.003.0009

This chapter outlines alternative approaches to achieving international counterterrorism policy objectives. The authors cite studies showing that law enforcement and political processes are the most effective means of bringing terrorist groups to an end. The chapter argues that countering terrorism is ultimately a political struggle, and calls for international cooperation to address the conditions conducive to violent extremism. A two-pronged approach is advocated: coordinated international police and intelligence efforts to prevent attacks, and parallel political, economic, and social measures aimed at eroding the support base for militancy and ameliorating the grievances that give rise to terrorism. These approaches are embodied in the UN Counterterrorism Strategy adopted in 2006. The UN Strategy elevates the importance of inclusive and accountable governance, peacebuilding, economic development, and human rights, in contrast to predominately military approaches to counterterrorism policy.

Keywords:   conflict transformation, Yemen, Pakistan, governance, UN Counter-terrorism Strategy, policing, human rights

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