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Capitalism and Cartography in the Dutch Golden Age$
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Elizabeth A. Sutton

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226254784

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226254814.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use (for details see http://www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 14 December 2017

Capitalism and Cartography Revisited

Capitalism and Cartography Revisited

Chapter:
(p.129) Six Capitalism and Cartography Revisited
Source:
Capitalism and Cartography in the Dutch Golden Age
Author(s):

Elizabeth A. Sutton

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226254814.003.0006

The themes advanced in chapters two through five are summarized. Issues exemplified in Dutch printed maps still resonate today in a globalized world. Even if Dutch merchants and members of its governing bodies did not initially intend to colonize, the need to expand for the economic growth fundamental to the capitalist system required them to legitimate their claims to possession of land, the exploitation of labor, and control of industrial processes. The printed map was a commodity, created by print-publishers based on state-sponsored corporations’ intelligence, commissioned by those bodies, or sold by the publisher on the open market. As the enforceability of Dutch power in the global economy waxed and waned over the century, maps became increasingly important products in the print market.

Keywords:   globalization, capitalism, world-system

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