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Light in GermanyScenes from an Unknown Enlightenment$
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T. J. Reed

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226205106

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226205243.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use (for details see www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 17 October 2018

Peace in Whose Time?

Peace in Whose Time?

The Ultimate Prize

Chapter:
(p.201) Chapter 11 Peace in Whose Time?
Source:
Light in Germany
Author(s):

T.J. Reed

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226205243.003.0011

Or almost ends. The grimmer realities of European life constantly threatened any fulfilment, great or small. Frederick the Great’s commitment to old political and military ways were at odds with his much-trumpeted attachment to the (French) Enlightenment. His was a ‘kingship[ of contradictions’. As once before, in the essay ‘What is Enlightenment?’ Kant enters into imagined dialogue with the King, critiquing rulers’ irresponsible addiction to war and setting out the conditions for a possible permanent state of peace. However seemingly improbable of achievement, they remain (like the critique) essentially valid today.

Keywords:   the war habit, Frederick the Great, enlightenment, contradiction, Immanuel Kant, eternal peace, aftermath, twentieth century

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