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Rescued from the NationAnagarika Dharmapala and the Buddhist World$
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Steven Kemper

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780226199078

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226199108.001.0001

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World Wanderer Returns Home

World Wanderer Returns Home

Chapter:
(p.376) Chapter Six World Wanderer Returns Home
Source:
Rescued from the Nation
Author(s):

Steven Kemper

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226199108.003.0006

When Dharmapala spoke of the social order, he moved between saving all Humanity and thinking locally, as his attitude to caste in Sri Lanka suggests. When he spoke of freedom and slavery, he spoke in registers that were more spiritual than usually recognized and less political. He may not have been seditious, but he was critical of all human beings. His renunciation allowed him to do so. Returning to Colombo at the end of his life, the world wanderer came home. In Colombo he campaigned for support for establishing the first Buddhist mission to the West in London. The unlikeliness of missionizing the metropole put off his Sinhala Buddhist co-religionists, and his contempt for local practices made things worse. Choosing to spend his last years in India and to have his remains kept there made the Anagarika (the homeless one) “homeless” in a way not usually recognized.

Keywords:   caste, universalism, freedom and slavery, sedition, world wanderer

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