Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Improving the Measurement of Consumer Expenditures$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Christopher D. Carroll, Thomas F. Crossley, and John Sabelhaus

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780226126654

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2016

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226194714.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use (for details see www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 17 November 2018

A Comparison of Micro and Macro Expenditure Measures across Countries Using Differing Survey Methods

A Comparison of Micro and Macro Expenditure Measures across Countries Using Differing Survey Methods

Chapter:
(p.263) 9 A Comparison of Micro and Macro Expenditure Measures across Countries Using Differing Survey Methods
Source:
Improving the Measurement of Consumer Expenditures
Author(s):

Garry Barrett

Peter Levell

Kevin Milligan

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226194714.003.0010

There are ongoing concerns about the reliability of household expenditure surveys in many countries. This chapter presents a comparative assessment of the performance of the household expenditure survey programs in Australia, Canada, the UK and US. We first assess the coverage of aggregate expenditure relative to national account benchmarks. It is found that the fall in response rates over time is predictive of changes in coverage rates within countries. Further, the growing concentration of income has been associated with an increasing concentration of expenditures which has not been captured well by the micro surveys. Turning to coverage rates for specific expenditure components, we find high and stable coverage of regularly purchased items, along with more volatile coverage of irregular and larger expenditure items. Therefore the aggregate patterns in coverage cannot be readily attributed to specific expenditure components or collection methods.

Keywords:   international comparison, household expenditure, survey coverage, response rate, expenditure surveys, Anglosphere countries, household survey, national accounts, survey response rates

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.