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A City for ChildrenWomen, Architecture, and the Charitable Landscapes of Oakland, 1850-1950$
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Marta Gutman

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780226311289

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: May 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226156156.001.0001

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New Ideas from Old Things in Oakland

New Ideas from Old Things in Oakland

Chapter:
(p.1) One New Ideas from Old Things in Oakland
Source:
A City for Children
Author(s):

Marta Gutman

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226156156.003.0001

This chapter opens the book by introducing key players and key nodes in the history of the charitable landscape in California; putting voluntary associations in context; explaining understandings of modern childhood; providing a brief history of Oakland and its urban development; and making the argument for using the cultural landscape to investigate women, children, and communities. Key concepts, from Henri Lefebvre, Michel Foucault, Jürgen Habermas, James Scott, and Jane Jacobs, are introduced. Procuring low-rent spaces in older buildings facilitated innovation, by women for urban children, showing that new places and ideas come from experimenting with older things and practices. Objects and spaces are also ripe for studying the cultural exchanges that shaped decisions and for assessing results including whether or not adults used the charitable landscape to exercise ethically adequate objectives for children and their childhoods.

Keywords:   modern childhood, cultural landscape, women, Henri Lefebvre, Michel Foucault, Jürgen Habermas, James Scott, Jane Jacobs, ethically adequate objectives

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