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Autonomy After AuschwitzAdorno, German Idealism, and Modernity$
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Martin Shuster

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780226155487

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2015

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226155517.001.0001

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Adorno’s Negative Dialectic as a Form of Life: Expression, Suffering, and Freedom

Adorno’s Negative Dialectic as a Form of Life: Expression, Suffering, and Freedom

Chapter:
(p.71) Chapter Three Adorno’s Negative Dialectic as a Form of Life: Expression, Suffering, and Freedom
Source:
Autonomy After Auschwitz
Author(s):

Martin Shuster

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226155517.003.0004

This chapter is the cornerstone of the book and accomplishes four large tasks. First, it elaborates Adorno’s theory of practical reason, including his notion of ‘the addendum,’ his philosophy of action, and his ethical theory. Second, it puts Adorno into a complex dialogue with Stanley Cavell, showing how their philosophies of language and also their ethical views intersect. Third, it elaborates what it means to be autonomous ‘after Auschwitz,’ showing the moral stakes of such an environment. Fourth, and finally, it puts Adorno’s theory of morality and action into dialogue with figures like Anscombe, Kant, and Davidson, amongst others.

Keywords:   Theodor W. Adorno, Stanley Cavell, forms of life, expressivism, Negative Dialectics, G. E. M. Anscombe, philosophy of action, normativity, addendum

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