Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Wartime PresidentExecutive Influence and the Nationalizing Politics of Threat$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

William G. Howell, Saul P. Jackman, and Jon C. Rogowski

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780226048253

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226048420.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use (for details see http://www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 16 August 2018

Case Studies II: Challenges

Case Studies II: Challenges

Chapter:
(p.217) Chapter 7 Case Studies II: Challenges
Source:
The Wartime President
Author(s):

William G. Howell

Saul P. Jackman

Jon C. Rogowski

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226048420.003.0007

The three case studies in this chapter, in one way or another, challenge the general claims of this book. With the federal government’s entrance into education policymaking in the late 1950s, we see the nationalizing effects of events—in this instance, the launching of the Soviet satellite Sputnik—that do not involve an actual military conflict. In Johnson’s escalation of the Vietnam War, we see a president’s military policy dictated, at least in part, by concerns about consolidating peace-time domestic policy achievements. And in Bush’s efforts to privatize Social Security, we see how wars that once furnished substantial executive influence subsequently hampered the president’s policy agenda.

Keywords:   Sputnik, education policy, Vietnam War, Great Society, social security reform, case studies

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.