Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Lawyer's MythReviving Ideals in the Legal Profession$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Walter Bennett

Print publication date: 2002

Print ISBN-13: 9780226042558

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: March 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226042565.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use (for details see www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 11 December 2018

A Preface to New Ideals: Coming to Terms with the Historical Masculinity of the Profession

A Preface to New Ideals: Coming to Terms with the Historical Masculinity of the Profession

Chapter:
(p.93) 8 A Preface to New Ideals: Coming to Terms with the Historical Masculinity of the Profession
Source:
The Lawyer's Myth
Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226042565.003.0009

The way to heal the legal profession as a profession is to take the understanding of what a profession is—a community of people similarly trained and with shared ideals, which is consciously in service to that which is greater than itself—and reconceive the meaning of this definition in the context of developing world. Historically the legal profession was exclusive by race and gender and to some degree social class. The legal profession in America began to institutionalize masculine characteristics after the Revolutionary War when the legal profession became a full-time occupation whose practitioners were no longer men of letters who practiced law as one of several occupations but devotees who made a career of honing ever-sharper skills of reasoning and rhetoric. Those myths grew from a masculine profession and portrayed the masculine ideals of the good lawyer or judge, but they showed a softer, more humane, and more morally conscious side of lawyers.

Keywords:   legal profession, masculine, lawyers, Revolutionary War, developing world

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.