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The Rise of the Public Authority
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The Rise of the Public Authority: Statebuilding and Economic Development in Twentieth-Century America

Gail Radford

Abstract

In the late nineteenth century, public officials throughout the United States began to experiment with new methods of managing their local economies and meeting the infrastructure needs of a newly urban, industrial nation. Stymied by legal barriers, they created a new class of quasi-public agencies called public authorities. Today these entities operate at all levels of government, and range from tiny operations such as the Springfield Parking Authority in Massachusetts, which runs thirteen parking lots and garages, to mammoth enterprises like the Tennessee Valley Authority, with nearly twelve ... More

Keywords: late nineteenth century, public officials, local economies, infrastructure needs, industrial nation, legal barriers, quasi-public agencies, public authorities, Springfield Parking Authority, Tennessee Valley Authority

Bibliographic Information

Print publication date: 2013 Print ISBN-13: 9780226037691
Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2013 DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226037868.001.0001

Authors

Affiliations are at time of print publication.

Gail Radford, author