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Why We Need Ordinary Language Philosophy$
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Sandra Laugier

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780226470542

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226037554.001.0001

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The Myth of Inexpressiveness

The Myth of Inexpressiveness

Chapter:
Chapter Eight (p.85) The Myth of Inexpressiveness
Source:
Why We Need Ordinary Language Philosophy
Author(s):

Sandra Laugier

Daniela Ginsburg

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226037554.003.0009

This chapter discusses the philosophical problem raised by ordinary language philosophy, which raises two questions. First, by what right do we base ourselves on what we ordinarily say? Second, on what, or on whom, do we base ourselves in order to determine what we ordinarily say? According to Cavell, however, these two questions are but one. This is a question of the relationship between me (my words) and the real (our world); for Cavell as for Wittgenstein, that is the question of our criteria. In discussing this, the chapter goes back to the examination of agreements in language. These agreements determine and are determined by criteria; we share criteria by means of which we regulate our application of concepts and through which we establish the conditions of conversation.

Keywords:   ordinary language, cavell, wittgenstein, criteria, agreements, conversation

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