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Planning the Home FrontBuilding Bombers and Communities at Willow Run$
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Sarah Jo Peterson

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780226025421

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226025568.001.0001

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A Bomber an Hour

A Bomber an Hour

Chapter:
(p.235) Chapter Eight A Bomber an Hour
Source:
Planning the Home Front
Author(s):

Sarah Jo Peterson

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226025568.003.0107

After countless problems, controversies, and disappointments, the Willow Run Bomber Plant finally showed what the Ford Motor Company and the federal government hoped it could do. The plant produced its 100th bomber on March 16, 1943, the 200th on April 24, the 500th on July 13, and the 1,000th on November 13. The 1,500th bomber left the final assembly line on January 14 the following year, the 2,000th on March 18, the 3,000th on June 16, and the 4,000th on August 29. 1 The plant achieved Charles Sorensen’s vision of churning out a bomber an hour and established production records in the aircraft industry. In all, Willow Run manufactured 8,685 and assembled 6,792 bombers, employing more than 80,000 workers to accomplish the feat.

Keywords:   bombers, Willow Run Bomber Plant, production, aircraft industry, workers, Ford Motor Company

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