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Sex Trafficking, Scandal, and the Transformation of Journalism, 1885–1917$
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Gretchen Soderlund

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780226021362

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226021676.001.0001

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Conclusion

Conclusion

Chapter:
(p.172) Conclusion
Source:
Sex Trafficking, Scandal, and the Transformation of Journalism, 1885–1917
Author(s):

Gretchen Soderlund

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226021676.003.0007

This chapter explains that sex trafficking has caused massive changes in the mass media and journalism conventions, because it was the focal point for scandals that were uncontained. Sex trafficking also served as a politically expedient weapon for waging ideological battles on a variety of fronts: economic (monopolists), social (aristocrats and immigrants), and sexual. Since white slavery scandals became a staple news item during the early part of the twentieth century, they became a ready-made controversy that was always there, lying dormant but becoming politically potent in times of political transformation as well as social, economic, and demographic change.

Keywords:   mass media, journalism, sex trafficking, white slavery, controversy

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