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Sex Trafficking, Scandal, and the Transformation of Journalism, 1885–1917$
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Gretchen Soderlund

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780226021362

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226021676.001.0001

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George Kibbe Turner, Muckraking, and the Brief Reign of Piteous Facts

George Kibbe Turner, Muckraking, and the Brief Reign of Piteous Facts

Chapter:
(p.98) Chapter Four George Kibbe Turner, Muckraking, and the Brief Reign of Piteous Facts
Source:
Sex Trafficking, Scandal, and the Transformation of Journalism, 1885–1917
Author(s):

Gretchen Soderlund

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226021676.003.0004

This chapter explores the rise of domestic sex trafficking concerns among citizens. From 1890 to 1907, sex trafficking was not considered a national concern. This changed when magazine coverage from journalists like George Kibbe Turner alarmed the citizens and helped shift the concern from international sex trafficking to domestic prostitution dens. The most significant factor in the early twentieth-century citizens’ fear of white slavery is rooted in the rise of national media, in the form of nationally distributed magazines that could create a large-scale, collective vulnerability through the use of sex trafficking stories. The resulting panic among citizens helped refocus concern from the regionalization of trafficking scandals to the direct discussion within cities about their own vice issues as part of a larger national problem.

Keywords:   sex trafficking, George Kibbe Turner, magazine coverage, collective vulnerability

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