Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Life AtomicA History of Radioisotopes in Science and Medicine$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Angela N. H. Creager

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780226017808

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226017945.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use (for details see www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 15 October 2018

Sales

Sales

Chapter:
(p.180) Chapter Six Sales
Source:
Life Atomic
Author(s):

Angela N. H. Creager

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226017945.003.0006

This chapter stresses the uneasy relationship between the U.S. government and industry in developing the civilian uses of atomic energy. The partially public, partially private nature of nuclear industry in the 1940s and early 1950s reflected the contradiction of government policy that promoted “free enterprise” while stringently guarding materials and technologies related to national security, which the 1954 revision to the Atomic Energy Act aimed to redress. Over the 1950s, a retail industry of radiolabeled compounds and radiopharmaceuticals was established. Some radioisotope production began to shift to the private sector in the 1960s, though the AEC remained involved in regulating the distribution and handling of radioactive materials.

Keywords:   U.S. Atomic Energy Commission (AEC), Industry, 1946 Atomic Energy Act, 1954 Atomic Energy Act, Paul Aebersold, Tracerlab, New England Nuclear, Regulation

Chicago Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs, and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us.