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Life AtomicA History of Radioisotopes in Science and Medicine$
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Angela N. H. Creager

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780226017808

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: January 2014

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226017945.001.0001

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Half-Lives

Half-Lives

Chapter:
(p.394) Chapter Eleven Half-Lives
Source:
Life Atomic
Author(s):

Angela N. H. Creager

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226017945.003.0011

This chapter reflects on the ‘half-life’ of radioisotopes in biology and medicine, stressing that their ubiquity in laboratories and clinics derived from the U.S. government’s policy of promoting atomic energy during the early Cold War. The consumption of radioisotopes is now waning, as many biologists have shifted to the use of non-radioactive tracers, although some radioisotopes (especially technetium-99m) remain important to medical diagnosis. The AEC’s radioisotope supply not only affected postwar research and clinical practice, but also involved the U.S. government in the regulation of scientists, an enduring legacy.

Keywords:   Regulation, Technetium-99m, 1954 Atomic Energy Act, Nuclear Regulatory Commission

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