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Disturbing PracticesHistory, Sexuality, and Women’s Experience of Modern War$
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Laura Doan

Print publication date: 2013

Print ISBN-13: 9780226001586

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226001753.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM CHICAGO SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com). (c) Copyright University of Chicago Press, 2017. All Rights Reserved. Under the terms of the licence agreement, an individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in CHSO for personal use (for details see http://www.chicago.universitypressscholarship.com/page/privacy-policy).date: 27 April 2018

Topsy-Turvydom

Topsy-Turvydom

Gender, Sexuality, and the Problem of Categorization

Chapter:
(p.97) 3 Topsy-Turvydom
Source:
Disturbing Practices
Author(s):

Laura Doan

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226001753.003.0004

This chapter examines how gender historians and historians of sexuality each discuss World War I’s disruptive effects in bringing together large numbers of like-minded women in war work and the military, but reach separate conclusions about the nature and significance of homosociality as a source of cultural anxiety. The former shows little interest in how the war contributed to the development of a more coherent narrative of female homosexual identity or distinct models of female homosexuality; their larger concerns focus on the perceived changes in the moral and social regulation of sexual relations between women and men. Historians of lesbianism, on the other hand, regard World War I as a turning point in the way in which homosexuality was represented.

Keywords:   gender historians, historians of sexuality, World War I, homosociality, cultural anxiety, female homosexuality, lesbianism

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