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American EgyptologistThe Life of James Henry Breasted and the Creation of His Oriental Institute$
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Jeffrey Abt

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780226001104

Published to Chicago Scholarship Online: September 2013

DOI: 10.7208/chicago/9780226001128.001.0001

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Epitaph

Epitaph

Chapter:
(p.397) Epitaph
Source:
American Egyptologist
Author(s):

Jeffrey Abt

Publisher:
University of Chicago Press
DOI:10.7208/chicago/9780226001128.003.0183

In his later years, James Henry Breasted reflected on the old days in Europe and Egypt, as well as the experiences of his boyhood. Although he expressed his desire to be cremated after his death, Breasted did not specify where his ashes should be buried. His father Charles and the rest of the family believed that he would want his ashes interred in Greenwood Cemetery, where the family plot was located. Established in 1845, Greenwood Cemetery is located along the western edge of Rockford near the Rock River in Illinois. After Breasted's cremation, Charles decided to place over his son's grave a “simple stone from Egypt” kindred with the tombs and temples of Egypt above his ashes. For the father of American Egyptology, the strangely out-of-place stone in a conventional American cemetery had its own meaning.

Keywords:   cremation, death, James Henry Breasted, egypt, greenwood cemetery, egyptology, illinois

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